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Why now is the time to tackle biogas leakage

FM BioEnergy use a methane-sensitive monitor and laser, as well as infra-red devices, to conduct their leak detection surveys
FM BioEnergy use a methane-sensitive monitor and laser, as well as infra-red devices, to conduct their leak detection surveys






Following a 10-year analysis of the scale of methane leakage at almost 1,000 AD plants across the UK and Europe, Tim Elsome, general manager of biogas specialists FM BioEnergy, outlines why now is the ideal time to tackle unidentified biogas leaks — and how to protect your plant, profits and the planet.
Anaerobic digestion (AD) plants are designed to convert biological feedstocks into biomethane-rich biogas and digestate. The aim is to convert the biomethane into usable energy either as heat, electrical power or as a replacement for fossil- derived gas fuels, including for use as a transport fuel.





However, what happens if the biomethane escapes from the digester through leakage? Not only does it reduce the efficiency of the AD plant (and with today’s high energy prices this can soon add up to significant lost income), but it can also pose a threat to health and safety, as well as being a significant greenhouse gas (GHG)...

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FM BioEnergy use a methane-sensitive monitor and laser, as well as infra-red devices, to conduct their leak detection surveys