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Three firms acquire stake in biogas firm Hyperthermics

Ronja Capital II, Stette Invest and Kjølås Stansekniver have collectively acquired a 23.3% stake in Norwegian biogas company, Hyperthermics.

Hyperthermics delivers compact systems that work as ‘boosters’ in biogas production, as well as systems that produce saleable proteins from different types of biomass.

The technology was developed to increase biogas yields and increase plant capacity. Its bio-active pretreatment plant treats the substrate before it enters the biogas rector. This process provides increased production and can replace a conventional hygienisation or pasteurisation plant, according to the firm.

“This is a very happy day,” said Erlend Haugsbø, CEO of Hyperthermics. “In addition to Ronja Capital taking a stake in the company, we are also joined by Frode Kjølås and Peder Stette.

“These three investors will collectively provide a significant boost to our investment in the aquaculture segment in the form of capital and networks. Tore Tønseth now has a seat on Hyperthermics’s board as a representative of the three new owners.”

Roger Halsebakk was responsible for developing Sølvtrans into the world’s largest wellboat company for the transportation of live salmon and trout. His investment director in Ronja Capital (Tønseth), said: “Hyperthermics offers a unique and ground-breaking technology and has made a huge effort to commercialise this technology.

“Ronja Capital sees great potential for Hyperthermics in a fast-growing green market. We know that their biogas method is fit for purpose. They are about to run a full-scale test production of proteins.

“Now that international aquaculture industries – with which we are very familiar – are gearing themselves towards land-based and closed solutions, the sector will more easily utilise these values.

“Other sectors that have biomass as waste are now, or will soon be, in the same situation. Hyperthermics is very well positioned to take part in this development.”




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