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ORLEN Południe signs LOI for 20 biogas plants

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Biorefining firm ORLEN Południe, of the ORLEN Group, has signed a letter of intent (LOI) to build 20 agricultural biogas plants based on “innovative” Polish technology.

The plants would enable the management of substrates from farms and their processing into electricity and biomethane. ORLEN Południe has signed a LOI on cooperation at the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development with H.CEGIELSKI-POZNAŃ, the National Centre of Agricultural Support, and the University of Life Sciences in Poznań.

The LOI concerns the construction of 20 biogas plants in Poland’s largest farms. ORLEN Południe would be the main investor in the biogas plant construction project. H.CEGIELSKI-POZNAŃ would be the general contractor and has the license to produce biogas plants based on the Polish patent belonging to Dynamic Biogas.

“The project assuming the construction of a biogas plant is important for all parties signing this agreement,” said Zbigniew Gryglas, Deputy Minister of State Assets, in a quote translated from Polish. “It is of great importance for the Polish economy and national energy security.

“We are proud that the Polish industry is able to implement the latest technologies in production and to cooperate with other companies interested in investing in such solutions.

“The implementation of a large-scale biogas plant development project is an important step towards building an efficient and economically and energetically-effective system of renewable energy sources. It is also an excellent example of reconciling various interests, the common denominator of which is Polish capital.”

Marcin Rej, president of the management board of ORLEN Południe, commented: “The production of electricity and biomethane from biogas is a business-friendly solution for us. It will also enable us to achieve the National Index Target and will be a response to the needs of today’s Europe.

“Biotechnology is the direction in which modern economies, including Poland, are heading. The European Green Deal assumes achieving climate neutrality by 2050, and this requires seeking alternatives to traditional energy sources. The investments we are implementing will significantly contribute to the achievement of the assumed goal by Poland.”