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Home heat decarbonisation report does not consider bioenergy potential, says REA

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A report into the decarbonisation of heating in UK homes does not consider the range of renewable technologies available, including biomass and biomethane, according to the REA.

The REA welcomed the report’s finding that there is much more to be done to decarbonise home heating, but warned it “fails to consider” the potential of green gases, such as biomethane.

The report by the Commons’ Business, Energy, and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) Committee on Decarbonising Heat in Homes recognises there is no ‘silver bullet’ option or ‘one size fits all’ approach to decarbonising domestic heating.

The REA supports the Committee’s calls to address the issue by calling for a heat decarbonisation sector deal, focusing on upskilling the heating sector, and increasing consumer awareness decarbonising their home’s heating.

Last year, the government announced the Heat and Buildings Strategy with reducing the reliance on fossil fuels and boilers to heat buildings cited as one of its key aims. The Select Committee found the strategy “lacked clear direction” on the issue, and that current policies were inadequate to the scale of the problem.

“The REA welcomes the publication of this report by the BEIS Select Committee and strongly agrees with its finding that much more needs to be done to deliver the decarbonisation of heat in our homes,” said Kiara Zennaro, head of heat and green gas lead at the REA.

“We support the Committee’s calls to address this, including a heat decarbonisation sector deal, focusing on upskilling the heating sector and increasing consumer awareness around decarbonising their home’s heating.”

Zennaro went on to say that the report does not consider the range of renewable heating technologies available, stating, “the committee is wrong to state that electrification is the only option in off-gas grid properties”.

“For example, to decarbonise off-grid homes it will also be appropriate to consider utilising biomass, biopropane and other biofuels, ensuring the right technology for the right situation. The report also fails to consider how green gases such as biomethane can be used to decarbonise our gas grid.

“The Committee must also now consider the non-domestic, business and commercial sector, where there are also major policy gaps in heat decarbonisation.”