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German firm BioEnergy enters Indian market in start-up partnership

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BioEnergy, a German company that provides technology and engineering design for biomass-based gas plants, has entered the Indian market in partnership with a Noida-based start-up, Gruner Renewable Energy (GRE).
A welcome & greetings ceremony was held in Nagpur, India, on 5 August, which invited partners, attendees, media representatives and guests.
The ceremony commenced with traditional diya lighting, introducing BioEnergy's GRE partners, German associates and media representatives, along with Achal Thool, a Nagpur-based businessman, who has invested ₹20 crore in building a 50 tonne-per-day biogas plant near Nagpur, which is likely to go on stream in a few months.
As part of the agenda, GRE gave an exclusive plant tour via a presentation, underlining the crucial role of its machinery and equipment in the biogas production process.
Following this, BioEnergy Germany showcased its innovative biogas technology, providing insights into the company’s mission and values.
Utkarsh Gupta, founder & CEO of the five-month-old Gruner Renewable told businessline that the company has secured 42 firm contracts for building biogas plants, with many more being in the offering.
Under the business model, Gruner Renewable will construct a customised biogas plant for clients utilising BioEnergy's design, and buy back the gas.
The gas will be retailed under the 'Gruner' brand name.
Gupta added that a typical plant of 40-50 tons-per-day of feedstock will cost about ₹15 crore to set up, and will yield two-three tonnes of gas per day.
A tonne of biomass will yield about 90 cubic metres of gas.
The 20-year-old BioEnergy has built over 300 plants in 12 countries and is currently building the world’s biggest one, in Malawi in southern Africa (where the gas will fuel a 56 MW power plant).
Gupta said that he was confident that Gruner Renewable would engender the setting up of at least 100 biogas plants in 2023, given the government’s plan to have 5,000 such plants by 2024.






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