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DMT to provide biogas upgrading technology for Thames Water project

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DMT Environmental Technology (DMT) will be the biogas upgrading technology provider for the first collaboration between Thames Water and SGN Commercial Services in the UK.

As one of the two contractors selected, SGN was awarded an eight-year framework, valued at £70 million (€82 million), by Thames Water. Additionally, SGN will design, construct, operate and maintain biogas processing installations at Thames Water’s wastewater treatment facilities.

The collaboration begins with Deephams Sewage Treatment Works, facility in Edmonton, England. This £7.3 million (€8.5 million) project will transform biogas generated during the sewage treatment process into biomethane using DMT’s membrane separation technology.

The DMT system also includes a unique twin compressor system and an enhanced pre-treatment system to remove high levels of hydrogen sulphide, volatile organic compounds and siloxanes often present in biogas derived from wastewater.

With completion expected in March 2022, Deephams Sewage Treatment Works will produce six million cubic metres of biomethane annually – enough to heat 3,500 homes in Enfield.

SGN Commercial Services is part of the SGN Group which owns and operates the gas distribution networks in the south of England, across Scotland and in the west of Northern Ireland.

DMT and SGN have had a long-standing partnership delivering biomethane projects since 2012, including Rainbarrow Farm – the UK’s first commercial gas-to-grid biogas plant from anaerobic digestion (AD).

“DMT is delighted to be working with SGN Commercial Services again,” said Stephen McCulloch, business director at DMT Environmental Technology. “Both teams have the experience and expertise to deliver future biomethane projects for Thames Water.”

As the UK’s largest water and wastewater services firm, Thames Water has been an early adopter of gas-to-grid technology since 2010. Currently, its 25 wastewater sites that use AD processes collectively produce more than 800 GWh of biogas.